From the monthly archives:

January 2001

Feeding the Children

by Original Author on January 29, 2001

Originally posted by Elder Gus Harter
Feeding the Children

Elder Travis Housley from Dawson Springs, Kentucky recently spent three weeks with us in the Philippines. His trip was extremely profitable to our churches and ministry. Before leaving the states a member of Dawson Spring Church gave Brother Travis some money and ear marked it for feeding hungry children. After consideration we decided to feed the children at our mountain church in Matanao served by Elder Junio Tabanyag. It was extremely delightful occasion. They gathered about 100 children and they had a feast. Fried chicken, rice (always rice) soup, condensed milk-brown sugar drink, mango ice cream and sufficient multi vitamins to last several weeks. This was the first time most of the children ever ate ice cream and they enjoyed it to the utmost. Probably the least enjoyment and yet most profit was taking of vitamins. I thought our readers would enjoy this event with the pictures.

In His Service,

Gus Harter
Photos:Feeding the Children

{ 0 comments }

The Third Visit to Iloilo City

by Original Author on January 17, 2001

Originally posted by Elder Gus Harter
The continued progress of the growth of our work in the province of Iloilo gave us opportunity to visit this new outreach again. Elder Travis Housley from Western Kentucky was with me so we schedule five days to work with them. Our plane arrived late on Wednesday night. We met with seven ministers already baptized, as well as Elder Manolo Dalman, Constancio Tejada and Junio Tabanyag to plan out the schedule and use our time most effectively. The entire work at Iloilo is blessed with both zeal and urgency. They are ready to work.

On Thursday morning we went to Bocacay Missionary Baptist Church to meet with the entire congregation. We first had a preaching service with both Elder Housley and I speaking. In the afternoon we had a conference with the entire group to answer questions about the church becoming a Primitive Baptist Church. They asked several question about our having any authority over their congregation. I told them our people believed in the autonomy of each congregation. My only admonition was to follow the New Testament in both doctrine and practice. We discussed at length why we do not have Sundays Schools or musical instruments in our worship service. They all after explanation seemed satisfied with our answers. The pastor of the church Elder Jerry Navarro was ordained at Pagadian City Primitive Baptist Church several years ago and moved to the Bacacay Community because it was his home. He could make a living in this community. The Baptist Church called him as pastor and he has been preaching our doctrine for two years. The church on this afternoon service past unanimously to unite with the Primitive Baptist and set Sunday January 14 for their baptism.

On Friday January 12 we met at the conference room in a hotel to present our doctrine to 28 ministers and their wives. Elder Housley and I divided the time. I opened with the five phases of salvation. Elder Housley took two sessions, one before lunch and one afternoon presenting the doctrines of Grace. Elder Dalman, Tejada and Tabanyag gave their reasons for uniting with our people and I concluded the day with the History and practice of the Primitive Baptist. That night we had a preaching service with Brother Travis going first and I closed the service. It was an encouraging day.

On Sunday we went to visit a mountain church in a beautiful area call Antique. Brother Edmund Linatan is the pastor. We had to cross a river to get to their village and our van could not make it. There were eight of us in the van so we rented a canoe to take us across. We visited the pastor’s home and several of the members came over as well. Brother Edmund was one of the original persons baptized. They serve us fresh coconut milk and some desert. Our visit was most profitable and enjoyable.

On Sunday Brother Housley went with the combination of the churches in Iloilo and I went to Bacacay Church for their service and the baptism following. At the conclusion of the meeting at Bacacay we went to the ocean for baptism. Thirty souls were baptized. Some of the members voted to join but wanted to be baptized later. Elder Housley baptized four also that had attended our Friday seminar. Brother Housley and Elder Tabanyag went on to Silay by boat to visit a small congregation on the island of Negros and I boarded a plane to return home. This area is one of the brightest spots among our churches.

We are greatly encouraged by this work in Iloilo and please pray for their growth with stability.

Your Servant in Christ,

Gus HarterPhotos:Third Visit to Iloilo City

{ 0 comments }

Church Structure in Matanao

January 16, 2001

Originally posted by Elder Gus HarterSix years ago after our initial trip to the Philippines, Elder Ricardo Tabanyag Jr. began a work with an Indian Tribe in the mountains southwest of Davao. When the work was first begun, you had to reach the settlement by horseback. Now they have a rough road, which Junio can […]

Read the full article →

Reflections from my home to yours. by: Betty Jo Harter

January 16, 2001

Originally posted by Betty Jo HarterI do not often have breathers where I can write. But this week Gus is in Iloilo City on Panay Island. The kids have settled a bit and I want to share some of our experiences. Having been here for four months now, we have so many emotions in our […]

Read the full article →

Revisit Cagayan de Oro

January 5, 2001

Originally posted by Elder Gus HarterRevisit Cagayan de OroDecember 29, 2000 I had three purposes in mind when I planned my fourth visit to the Philippines. One was a continuation of the work with the fellowships in the Cagayan de Oro area. Elder Levi Sebuala, in typical Philippine fashion, was anxious to share with his […]

Read the full article →

The First National Primitive Baptist Fellowship Meeting

January 4, 2001

Originally posted by Elder Gus HarterOne of my major goals in coming to the Philippines was to unite our people. Very few of our brethren own automobiles and telephones and therefore this causes isolation from other sections of the Philippines. Our churches are often separated from each other and all they know is their own […]

Read the full article →